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Hannah Baillie, Editor in Chief, 90Second Caregiver
Patrick McGrath, OC, PhD, FRSC, Principal Scientist - 90Second Caregiver

Maintaining friendships

Maintaining friendships...
Keeping friendships

Sometimes, it's what a person doesn’t say that hurts the most. Friends who have been by your side for many years may struggle to support you in your role as a caregiver, especially if they have never experienced caregiving.  

Preventing isolation

Your friends might call or text less often when they don’t know what to say or do. This can cause feelings of isolation and loneliness. Make sure to reach out to your friends as often as you can to maintain your friendships.

... CALL TO ACTION...

Keeping friendships

Sometimes, it's what a person doesn’t say that hurts the most. Friends who have been by your side for many years may struggle to support you in your role as a caregiver, especially if they have never experienced caregiving.  

Preventing isolation

Your friends might call or text less often when they don’t know what to say or do. This can cause feelings of isolation and loneliness. Make sure to reach out to your friends as often as you can to maintain your friendships.

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Keeping friendships

Sometimes, it's what a person doesn’t say that hurts the most. Friends who have been by your side for many years may struggle to support you in your role as a caregiver, especially if they have never experienced caregiving.  

Preventing isolation

Your friends might call or text less often when they don’t know what to say or do. This can cause feelings of isolation and loneliness. Make sure to reach out to your friends as often as you can to maintain your friendships.

CALL TO ACTION
assessment, when selecting options, 1 is false, 5 is true.I make an effort to send messages to my friends.please select an option..I am comfortable asking my friends for help.please select an option..My friends are usually willing to help when I ask.please select an option..I have not experienced any changes in friendships since becoming a caregiver.please select an option..I am comfortable leaving the one I care for at home when I go out. please select an option..My friends are up to date on my caregiving situation. please select an option..It is possible to have a social life and be a caregiver. please select an option.. Please submit the form to get your assessment.
Personal Story. Personal Story.

I was 45 years old when my 15-year-old daughter was in a car accident and suffered a brain injury. Up until that moment, we were both well-connected people with active social lives. When she suffered her injury, our friendships took a hit. All of a sudden, we were tossed into this world where no one could really understand what we were going through because a severe brain injury at such a young age is rare. None of my friends had been caregivers before, so they didn’t understand the level of work and dedication it took to keep my daughter healthy. When I stopped calling and texting them, they thought it was because I didn’t want to see them anymore.

Over a few months, I realized that friendships were important to my well-being. I made an effort to send texts to my friends, sometimes about caregiving and sometimes about lighter subjects. I invited them in for tea when possible, and went out as often as I could, although it wasn’t as much as before the injury. After drifting into isolation in the beginning, I realized that maintaining friendships takes a lot of work - but it is so worth it!

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